We know that getting outside is good for us. Whether you are facing times of great uncertainty, stress, and sadness or you are just looking to get some fresh air, nature can help. However, it can be hard to find the motivation to step outside with the intention to enjoy nature when we have so much on our plates inside. That’s where participating in a challenge with like-minded people can make a big difference!

Enter the Hike it Baby 30 challenge. This bi-annual fundraiser and member-based challenge (which will be entirely virtual for April 2020 in response to the COVID-19 outbreak) encourages families across the globe to get their babies and children outside more frequently for 30 days in the months of April and September. Whether you choose to strive for 30 miles in 30 days or 30 minutes outside 3 times a week, you can truly make the challenge fit the needs of your family!

 

Outdoor Activities to Get you Started

Not sure what to do with the kids once you get them outside? We’re here to help! We have compiled this list of 30 things you can do outside in 30 minutes. And you won’t even need to set foot in your car or leave your neighborhood to do any of them!

  1. Take a walk around your neighborhood. You can even create a fun neighborhood scavenger hunt for the kiddos to complete. Items cans include things unique to your neighborhood such as a house with a red door, a garden gnome, a bench, etc.
  2. Go for a bike ride around your neighborhood.
  3. Practice family-friendly nature yoga in nature. 
  4.  “Paint” with mud or water. See what masterpieces your kiddos can create!
  5. Identify sprouting plants and talk about the life cycles of plants. 
  6. Ignite the senses by going on a sensory walk or backyard sensory exploration.
  7. Read a nature book outside.
  8. Build a fort. You can use anything available such as sticks, tree branches, a hammock, blankets, etc.
  9. Download the Explore Your Own World and Create Your Own World outdoor tool kits and turn your outdoor space into an epic adventure! (Hike it Baby members, grab your discount code from the Community Discounts page)
  10. Birdwatch using binoculars. Don’t have binoculars? Here is an easy DIY craft to make your own with two supplies you are likely to have in your house right now: Duct tape and toilet paper rolls!
  11. Eat a meal outside. Check out this article for some fun bug-themed snacks to include. Ants on a log anyone?
  12. Go on a rainbow search. Search for items outside in every color of the rainbow, from a purple flower to a red tricycle.
  13. Pitch a tent in your yard and camp or play in it.
  14. Stargaze and identify constellations. Check out this article for printable star charts showing the most prominent constellations by season.
  15. Show your garden some love and teach your kiddos how to plant, weed, and appreciate plants.
  16. Head out after dark and go on a glow stick or flashlight neighborhood walk.
  17. Go on a backyard scavenger hunt. You can make up a quick list of things for your kiddos to find such as a yellow flower, an ant, something rough, etc. Check out this article for more inspiration.
  18. Have an outdoor dance party. Play music on your phone or a speaker and dance away!
  19. Create an obstacle course using anything around you. Have kids balance on a log, crawl under a chair, hop over a rock, walk along a chalk path, the sky’s the limit!
  20. Play classic kid games such as freeze tag, hopscotch, Simon Says, red light, green light, or “Mother May I”.
  21. Make a nature journal and have your kids find a sit-spot outside to write or doodle whatever comes to mind.young kids playing in the grass
  22. Play outdoor hide and seek with toys. You can hide dinosaurs, stuffed animals, etc. and have your kiddos find them around your yard.
  23. Pull out the sidewalk chalk to create masterpieces or write encouraging words for your family and others passing by to enjoy.
  24. Be a nature photographer. Let your kiddo point out what interests them and help take a photo with your phone. Or let older kids borrow a camera and see what they come up with.
  25. Search for images in the clouds. Want to take it a step further? Here is an article that explains the differences between the different types of clouds.
  26. Go on a backyard bug hunt. Grab a magnifying glass and search for spiderwebs, camouflaged critters, pollinators, etc.
  27. Play with sticks and see how many things that stick can turn into.
  28. Do shadow drawings of favorite toys such as dinosaurs or animals. Check out this article for more shadow drawing inspiration.
  29. Bring out the water table or create your own with buckets or plastic bins. Grab some small containers such as old butter or yogurt containers and watch their imaginations go to work. 
  30. Go on an alphabet or shape hunt. Look for letters or shapes in the outdoors such as a rectangle brick or the letter V-shaped by tree branches. Challenge older kiddos to find the letters of their name or see if your toddler can find 3 different shapes in the backyard.

Enjoying the outdoors is as easy as stepping out your front door! Need some extra motivation for getting your family out the door, taking advantage of the many benefits of nature? Join the Hike it Baby 30 Virtual Challenge! REGISTER FOR THE APRIL CHALLENGE TODAY! 


About Hike it Baby

Hike it Baby is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to getting families outdoors and on trails across the U.S. and internationally, supporting, educating and inspiring families through their more than 300 communities across North America. Since its grassroots inception in 2013 in Portland, Oregon, Hike it Baby is now a growing community of 270,000 families and 500 volunteer branch ambassadors hosting more than 1,600 hikes per month. More information, as well as daily hike schedules, can be found at HikeitBaby.com, Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, and Instagram.

Photos courtesy of Jessica Campbell, Krystal Weir, and Amy Diebold.

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